Grand Mandarin New Bridge Road Singapore

IMG_298854 (FILEminimizer)I doubt I could just pass Grand Mandarin restaurant along New Bridge Road as just another ordinary Cantonese restaurant. With a local executive chef previously from one Michelin-starred Hakkasan New York City, this is definitely a great addition to the many established Chinese restaurants in Singapore.

The two story restaurant conveniently located across Pearls Central has received quite a bit of media attention since their inception just earlier this year. I did my research prior my first visit and personally, I’m quite impressed with a few of their reviews. Read here, here & here.

Side note, for those coming by train, alight at Outram Park Station and take exit H. The restaurant is literally right in front.

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Note that these are tasting portions.

Featuring the start of our luncheon were three of their exquisite dishes (from left to right): Fried Soft Shell Crab With Chicken Floss And Curry Leaves ($18.00), Crispy Roast Pork Belly ($15.00) and Honey Glazed Barbequed Pork Loin ($15.00).

I quite like the idea of combining curry and floss to go with the sweetness from the crab. It’s something I least expect to be good. And I kinda knew the skin from the roast pork was gonna be crisp but it was crisp on a whole new definition. I honestly felt a little embarrassed having to make loud crunches that could be heard across our 10-seater table. The meat itself was flavourful yet not too heavy and oily.IMG_2935 (FILEminimizer)Their barbequed pork loin has been the talk of everyone’s blog. I have my reservations to proclaim Grand Mandarin rendition as the best. I believe every chef have their own techiques and recipes which results in sensory variations.

But I must admit that there are few place left in Singapore that can rival the well-caramelized meat I had here. Again, it’s not oily or ridiculously sweet so it’s no wonder why there’s so much raves on just one dish.IMG_29343 (FILEminimizer)As with any self-proclaimed Cantonese would think, no meal would be complete if there’s no soup to sip. The double boiled Clear Soup Of Lobster With Black Fungus, Gingko Nuts And Chinese Marrow ($18.00) deserves my recommendation. A perfect example exemplifying the importance of superior broth in Cantonese cuisine.

My favourite was their Baked Silver Cod With Spicy Lemongrass Infuse ($22.00). Tender moist and fresh with a nice char on the outside to keep the fish steak intact. I like to keep my description for good food simple. No need for extensive jargon just tuck in and savour!IMG_29630 (FILEminimizer) The other two dishes: Stir-Fried Wild Mushroom With Lily Bulbs And Kai Lan ($18.00) and Fried Rice With Fresh Crab Meat And Fish Roe ($20.00) weren’t really worth mentioning compared to the dish I had earlier. But rest assure they could be considered for any meal here.

My much anticipated part of any meal; Desserts which was a decent serving of Green Apple Jelly & Lime Sorbet. ($8.00). A clean and refreshing sweet end of our media luncheon.
IMG_2970 (FILEminimizer)Grand Mandarin is also one of the few restaurants that features the world’s most expensive freshwater fish, Empurau on their menu. For the unbelieve, this is one fish that could easily fetch up to a thousand dollars a kilo. So do the math when a fully mature adult could easily weight beyond 3kg.

I definitely will recommend Grand Mandarin not just for festive occasions but weekly family reunions as well. Compared to other established Chinese restaurants in town, I doubt they are overpriced or too expensive.

The second floor are usually reserve for private gatherings but if I’m here again (most likely for their Liu Sha Bao ($4.80) and really affordable dim sums), I would take a table on ground level. I quite love the black gold ambience.IMG_2990 (FILEminimizer)Grand Mandarin
325 New Bridge Road #01/02-00
Singapore 088760
Tel:+65 6222 3355
Daily: 11.30pm – 2.30pm
6.30pm – 10.00pm
Note: This is an invited media tasting.

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